Resources

Game-designing project teaches collaboration, engineering skills

Game-designing project teaches collaboration, engineering skills
Students at a Connecticut school partnered with younger peers to design and build cardboard games. Based on the Global Cardboard Challenge, the schoolwide hands-on project allowed students to collaborate while applying math and engineering skills. The Day (New London, Conn.) (free registration) (10/31)

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World Series math lessons are a home run for students

mathematics, calculator, textbook, science, university, statistics, physics

(Pexels)

Fourth-graders at a Kansas elementary school have been using batting averages and other data from the World Series to learn math. Students have used the data to create graphs and predict who would win the series based on the statistics. WDAF-TV (Kansas City, Mo.) (10/30)

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How One School Uses Restorative Practices for Discipline

How one school uses restorative practices for discipline

Classroom

(Lionel   Bonaventure/Getty Images)

A restorative approach to discipline recognizes the developmental stage and possible trauma experiences of middle-school students and uses relationships to encourage appropriate behavior, California teacher Karen Junker says. In this Q&A, she explains how the process works in her school and the roles of restorative practices and suspensions in discipline policies. WBUR-FM (Boston) (10/30)

Core Story 5: Resilience

New video on resiliency in young children!

In partnership with the University of Minnesota's Institute of Child Development, CASCW created Core Story 5: Resilience. This video is a part of the Trauma and Early Childhood Development Discussion Guide for Child Welfare developed in partnership with the Center for Early Education and Development, which will be released later this month. Children are incredibly resilient – the same rapid brain development that occurs in the first few years of life that make young children particularly vulnerable to maltreatment also make those same children particularly receptive to intervention. The concept of resiliency is especially important to keep in mind when working with young children in foster care. This video features experts discussing the process that results in resiliency in young children and the factors that can be put in place to bolster resiliency.

  1. What does resiliency mean?
  2. What is the most important factor for promoting resiliency in the face of adversity for young children?
  3. What are other factors that can promote resiliency when a child does not have a history of positive, responsive “serve and return” interactions with their caregivers?
  4. What are other factors that can promote resiliency when a child does not have a history of positive, responsive “serve and return” interactions with their caregivers?

Watch Video


Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare, University of Minnesota

1404 Gortner Ave.

St. Paul, MN 55108

Beginning with the End in Mind: State Title I, Part D Logic Model Development Guide for Youth who are Neglected or Delinquent

Beginning   With the End in Mind: State Title I, Part D Logic Model Development Guide for   Youth Who Are Neglected or Delinquent

This   guide provides an introduction to logic models. It describes what a logic   model is, outlines why and how a logic model can be useful, and provides   questions to consider when designing a logic model. The tool addresses   questions separately for programs serving youth who are neglected and   programs serving youth who are delinquent.

Federal Student Aid Eligibility for Students Confined in Adult Correctional or Juvenile Justice Facilities

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Federal Student Aid Eligibility for Students Confined in Adult Correctional or Juvenile Justice Facilities

Below you’ll find answers to questions you may have about how being incarcerated in an adult correctional facility or committed to a juvenile justice facility affects your eligibility for federal student aid for college or career school.

1. Am I eligible for federal student aid while I’m confined in a correctional or juvenile justice facility?

If you are confined in a correctional or juvenile justice facility, there are limits on your eligibility for federal student aid based on where you are confined.

Note that most of these limitations apply only while you are confined. Upon your release, these limitations will be removed unless the circumstances discussed in question 6 of this document apply. You may apply for financial aid while you are confined in anticipation of being released so that your application may be processed in time for you to start school following your release.

Important note: Even if you are not eligible for federal student aid, you may still be eligible for aid from your state or school.

2. Am I eligible for federal student loans while I’m confined in a correctional or juvenile justice facility?

No. Any individual who is considered incarcerated may not receive federal student loans. For purposes of loan eligibility, you are considered incarcerated if you are serving a criminal sentence in a penitentiary, prison, jail, reformatory, work farm, or similar correctional institution, whether it is operated by a government agency or by a contractor to a government entity. You are also considered to be incarcerated if you have been delinquent and are committed to a juvenile justice facility. You are not considered to be incarcerated if you are in a halfway house or in home detention or are sentenced to serve only on weekends, or if you are confined in a correctional or juvenile justice facility prior to the imposition of a criminal sentence, such as while you are awaiting trial.

3. Am I eligible for Federal Pell Grants while I’m confined in a correctional or juvenile justice facility?

It depends on where you are confined. Individuals incarcerated in federal or state penal institutions may not receive Federal Pell Grants. However, if you are incarcerated in a local, municipal, or county correctional facility and you otherwise meet eligibility criteria, you are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant. If you are committed to a juvenile justice facility and you otherwise

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meet eligibility criteria, you are eligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant, regardless of whether the juvenile justice facility is administered by a federal, state, or local government or agency.

4. Am I eligible to receive Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) and Federal Work-Study (FWS) funds while I’m confined in a correctional or juvenile justice facility?

Although incarcerated individuals may be technically eligible to receive an FSEOG and FWS, you are unlikely to receive either type of funds due to the limited amount of those funds available to the school and because of the logistical difficulties of a student performing an FWS job while confined in a correctional or juvenile justice facility.

5. Am I eligible for federal student aid if I am released on probation or on parole?

As noted in question 1, the restrictions that apply while you are confined in a secure facility are removed when you’re released, even if you are released on probation or parole, unless any of the circumstances in question 6 apply to you.

6. What types of convictions will continue to affect my eligibility for federal student aid after my release?

If you were convicted as an adult for the possession or sale of illegal drugs, your federal student aid eligibility may be suspended if the offense occurred while you were receiving federal student aid. When you complete the

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®), as discussed in question 7 below, you’ll be asked whether you had a drug conviction for an offense that occurred while you were receiving federal aid. If your answer is yes, you’ll be provided with a worksheet to help determine whether the conviction affects your eligibility for federal student aid.

If you have been convicted of a forcible or nonforcible sexual offense and you are subject to an involuntary civil commitment upon completion of a period of incarceration for that offense, you are ineligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant.

7. How do I apply for federal student aid?

To apply for federal student aid, and for most state and institutional aid, you must complete the FAFSA, either online at

www.fafsa.gov or on paper. You do not have to pay to apply for federal student aid. Contact the education coordinator at your correctional or juvenile justice facility or the financial aid office at the school you plan to attend for more information and help accessing the FAFSA. Remember that even if you’re not eligible for federal student aid, you may still be eligible for aid from your state or school.

8. What address do I provide when applying for federal student aid?

When applying for federal student aid while confined, use the mailing address of your current correctional or juvenile justice facility. Once released, you must update your mailing address, which you can do at

www.fafsa.gov or by calling 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243). Page 3 of 4

9. How can I get help applying for federal student aid?

If you have questions about federal student aid, including the application process, contact the education coordinator at your correctional or juvenile justice facility, the school you plan to attend, or the e-mail or toll-free number provided on page 4 of this document.

10. How do I make sure that any federal student loans that I have do not go delinquent or default?

You may be eligible for a deferment or forbearance of your federal student loans if you are unable to make payments on those loans while you are confined. During a period of deferment or forbearance, you would not be required to make payments, but interest may continue to accrue. It is important to make sure that you do not go into default on those loans, as doing so could have serious repercussions after your release and will affect your eligibility for Pell Grants or future loans.

For information about deferments and forbearances, visit

StudentAid.gov/deferment-forbearance, contact your loan servicer, or call or e-mail the Federal Student Aid Information Center using the contact information on page 4 of this document. You also may visit www.nslds.ed.gov.

11. What do I do if I have defaulted federal student loans?

Work with your loan servicer to resolve the default. Options for getting out of default include full repayment of the loan, loan rehabilitation, and loan consolidation upon release. Learn more about getting out of default at

StudentAid.gov/end-default.

12. Am I eligible for loan consolidation while I am confined in a correctional or juvenile justice facility?

No. Individuals who are confined in correctional or juvenile justice facilities may not consolidate their federal student loans into a federal consolidation loan while they are confined.

13. How can I receive publications about federal student aid?

To receive a FAFSA or any other Federal Student Aid publications, all of which are free, contact your correctional institution’s education coordinator; call or e-mail the Federal Student Aid Information Center (see page 4 of this document); order online at

www.edpubs.gov; or download them at StudentAid.gov/resources. Page 4 of 4

Get More Information About Federal Student Aid

Student Website

Visit

StudentAid.gov for information about types of aid, student eligibility, how to apply, and repaying loans.

Federal Student Aid Information Center (FSAIC)

Get answers to your questions.

Toll free: 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243)

Toll: 319-337-5665

TTY for the hearing impaired: 1-800-730-8913

E-mail:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

December 2014

U.S. Department of Education Launches Second Chance Pell Pilot Program for Incarcerated Individuals

Program will build on existing research to examine effects restoring Pell eligibility As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to create a fairer, more effective criminal justice system, reduce recidivism, and combat the impact of mass incarceration on communities, the Department of Education today announced a Second Chance Pell Pilot program to test new models to allow incarcerated Americans to receive Pell Grants and pursue the postsecondary education with the goal of helping them turn their lives around and ultimately, get jobs, support their families, and stay out of trouble. High-quality correctional education - including postsecondary correctional education - has been shown to measurably reduce re-incarceration rates. By reducing recidivism, correctional education can ultimately save taxpayers money and create safer communities. According to a Department of Justice funded 2013 study from the RAND Corporation, incarcerated individuals who participated in correctional education were 43 percent less likely to return to prison within three years than prisoners who didn't participate in any correctional education programs. RAND estimated that for every dollar invested in correctional education programs, four to five dollars are saved on three year re-incarceration costs. Despite this compelling research, in 1994, Congress amended the Higher Education Act (HEA) to eliminate Pell Grant eligibility for students in federal and state penal institutions. The United States currently has the highest incarceration rate in the world with more than 1.5 million prisoners. The pilot being announced today will restore educational opportunity for some of those individuals, improving their chances to stay out of prison and become productive members of their communities after they are released. "As the President recently noted, for the money we currently spend on prison we could provide universal pre-k for every 3- and 4-year-old in America or double the salary of every high school teacher in the country," said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. "America is a nation of second chances. Giving people who have made mistakes in their lives a chance to get back on track and become contributing members of society is fundamental to who we are - it can also be a cost-saver for taxpayers." Through this pilot program, incarcerated individuals who otherwise meet Title IV eligibility requirements and are eligible for release, particularly within the next five years, could access Pell Grants to pursue postsecondary education and training. The goal is to increase access to high- quality educational opportunities and help these individuals successfully transition out of prison and back into the classroom or the workforce. Incarcerated students who receive Pell Grants through this pilot will be subject to cost of attendance restrictions, so Pell Grants can only be used to pay for tuition, fees, books and supplies required by an individual's education program. Incarcerated individuals will not be eligible to receive other types of Federal student aid under this pilot. The pilot program builds upon previous Obama Administration efforts. A report from President Obama's "My Brother's Keeper Task Force" recommended enforcing the rights of incarcerated youth, including access to a quality education and eliminate unnecessary barriers to reentry. Last December, the Departments of Education and Justice released a Correctional Education Guidance Package to improve education programs in juvenile justice facilities and clarified existing rules around Pell Grant eligibility for youth housed in juvenile justice facilities and individuals held in local and county jails. The pilot program is intended to build on this guidance and expand access to high-quality postsecondary educational opportunities and support the successful reentry of adults. The Department of Education is authorized under HEA to periodically administer experiments to test the effectiveness of statutory and regulatory flexibility for participating postsecondary institutions in disbursing federal student aid. When determining which institutions will be selected for participation in this experiment, the Department will consider evidence that demonstrates a strong record on student outcomes and in the administration of the title IV HEA programs. The deadline for postsecondary institutions to apply for this pilot program is September 31, 2015 for the 2016-2017 academic year. Public Policy and External Relations Contacts Victor Dickson, President and CEO B. Diane Williams, President Emeritus Sodiqa Williams, AVP, Policy and Strategy Anthony Lowery, Director, Policy and Advocacy Phone: 312-922-2200 www.saferfoundation.org

The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls' Story

Please take the time to read the article below The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls' Story It will help to increase your awareness of Human Trafficking especially as it affects our population! http://rights4girls.org/wp-content/uploads/r4g/2015/02/2015_COP_sexual-abuse_layout_web-1.pdf